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23.10.2010


Rubus coreanus raises testosterone level by factor 7: animal study

The Korean cousin of our raspberry, Rubus coreanus, is a real testosterone booster according to researchers at Chungbuk National University in Korea. Give extracts of these fruits to mice, and their testosterone levels soar by 750 percent.

Rubus coreanus raises testosterone level by factor 7: animal study


Rubus coreanus raises testosterone level by factor 7: animal study

Rubus coreanus raises testosterone level by factor 7: animal study
Koreans have been using Rubus coreanus [see photo] for years as a remedy for impotence and infertility. Extracts of the green, unripe fruit for this are sold as supplements on the market [middle photo]. The Korean food industry uses ripe Rubus coreanus fruits to make wine, jam, cookies and sweets.

Bodybuilders who pay attention to labels will also be familiar with Rubus coreanus. MuscleTech put extracts of the fruit, together with Fadogia agrestis, taurine, riboflavin, alpha-aminobutyeric acid, extract from Arnold Schwarzenegger's underpants and another four hundred muscle building component into Anabolic Halo. Muscle Tech's competitors put Rubus coreanus in Anabolic OD. Exactly how much Rubus coreanus is contained in these combo-products is not mentioned on the labels.

The Koreans made extracts of unripe [FGRC] and ripe [FFRC] fruits of Rubus coreanus, and fermented them for two days with baker's yeast. Then they fed the extracts to mice. The table below shows that it was the extract of the ripe, not the unripe, fruits that boosted the testosterone level by a factor 7.5. The mice's sperm count increased too.


Rubus coreanus raises testosterone level by factor 7: animal study

Rubus coreanus raises testosterone level by factor 7: animal study

Rubus coreanus raises testosterone level by factor 7: animal study


The researchers gave the extracts to the mice for 4 weeks, but found no noticeable effects on bodyweight, testes, seminal vesicles or the prostate.

That's pretty weird. If you increase a mouse's testosterone level by almost eight times, the least you'd expect is that it would grow out of its cage, wreck its treadmill in a fit of 'roid rage, or bite through the railings and eat up a couple of lab assistants. But nothing of the kind. The mice's prostate didn't even grow by a microgram.

We don't trust this Rubus coreanus. So we're issuing a Tribulus warning.

Oh yes. The researchers also looked at whether the extracts had corpus cavernosum-relaxing effects, which would mean they imitate the effect of erection-enhancing substances like sildenafil. This was not the case either.

Source:
J Med Food. 2008 Sep; 11(3): 474-8.

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