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22.04.2009


Norandrostenedione: injections work, pills don't

Since George Bush outlawed the stuff in 2004, the prohormone 19-nor-androstenedione is no longer officially on the market. Nevertheless it's still satisfying to know after the event that it didn't work anyway. The news comes in an animal study by German biochemists, which were published shortly in Toxicology Letters. According to the study, 19-nor-androstenedione works fine if you inject it, but taken orally it has no effect at all.

The prohormone 19-nor-androstenedione came on to the supplements market in the late nineties, as a follow-up to the commercially successful androstenedione. Enzymes in the body convert androstenedione into testosterone, and likewise, enzymes convert 19-nor-androstenedione into nandrolone. The reaction is shown below.


Norandrostenedione: injections work, pills don't


You can read more about prohormones in general and nandrolone prohormones in particular in Chapter 15 of The Anabolics Book.

Norandrostenedione: injections work, pills don't
Researchers are still studying nandrolone prohormones. American researchers published an animal study about eighteen months ago in which they reported that subcutaneous use of a relation of 19-nor-androstenedione has considerable anabolic but minimal androgenic properties. [Endocrinology. 2008 Apr;149(4):1987-93.] The substance behaved in almost the same way as a SARM, according to the researchers.

The Germans come up with similar findings. Below you see the effect of injections of testosterone propionate [TP] or 1 mg/kg/day of 19-nor-androstenedione [NOR sc], and daily oral administration [NOR po] of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg/day respectively. The first figure shows the effect on the sphincter muscle, a marker for the desired anabolic effects. The second figure shows the effect on the prostate, a marker for the undesirable androgenic effects.


Norandrostenedione: injections work, pills don't

Norandrostenedione: injections work, pills don't


Regardless of the amount of 19-nor-androstenedione the researchers gave the rats orally, the steroid had no anabolic effect. Spanish researchers, who studied the closely related 19-nor-androdiol, have recently shown why: the liver rapidly converts the prohormone into inactive metabolites. [Steroids. 2008 Aug;73(7):751-9.]

Injecting 19-nor-androstenedione does work though, according to the Germans, and seems not to affect the prostate.

Nevertheless, oral administration of 19-nor-androstenedione does have effects. Only none of them are good. "Analysis of the tissue weight data in the rat indicates that oral intake of NOR at higher doses correlates with a loss of body weight in the rat which can be interpreted as an indicator for toxicity and thus negative side effects", the researchers write.


Norandrostenedione: injections work, pills don't


"Summarizing the data, it is obvious that oral intake of nutritional supplementation products containing NOR may be useless for increasing skeletal muscle mass but very likely is associated with adverse side effects", the researchers conclude their article. By the way, their research was financed by the WADA, anti-doping agency. And this is reflected in the way the researchers formulate their writing. It's clear that a PR troll was reading over their shoulders, with a red felt pen to hand.

Should you be thinking of experimenting with 19-nor-androstenedione injections, don't forget about the estrogenic and progestagenic side-effects. Test-tube studies of 19-nor-androstenedione metabolites have shown that they interact pretty good with the estradiol and progesterone receptors.

Source:
Toxicology Letters doi:10.1016/j.toxlet.2009.03.024.