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16.01.2011


Evodiamine for weight loss

Give rats evodiamine [structural formula shown below] mixed in their food for three weeks, and they'll end up with half as much body fat as those not given the stuff. According to a Japanese animal study done in 2001, evodiamine, a compound found in the fruit of the plant Evodia rutaecarpa, doubles fat burning.

Evodiamine

Evodiamine

In classical Chinese herbal medicine, extracts of Evodia rutaecarpa are classified as 'hot herbs'. Because a number of these like peppers raise the metabolic rate, and thus the amount of calories burned, researchers at the Japanese pharmaceutical company Kyowa Kakko Kogyo wanted to know whether it is possible to make a slimming aid from these extracts.

Evodia rutaecarpa contains evodiamine. The researchers extracted this out of the first extract and then mixed it with the rats' food. The concentration was 0.02 percent. The researchers gave the rats food that was high in fat so that any slimming effects would be clearly visible.

After three weeks they noticed that the animals in the eviodiamine group had only half the amount of fat that the other group had.


Evodiamine for weight loss


Evodiamine for weight loss


When the researchers injected a large quantity of evodiamine into the gut of the lab animals, the rats' body temperature dropped. The figure above shows this. The bars in the left part of the figure represent the rats that hadn't eaten; the bars on the right the rats that had eaten as much as they wanted.

The drop in body temperature occurred because evodiamine dilates the blood vessels, so the animals lose heat more quickly, the researchers think. Subcutaneous injections of evodiamine led to a rise in the tail temperature, as the graph below shows. The rats won't have noticed it, but evodiamine has a thermogenic effect.


Evodiamine for weight loss


The researchers suspect that evodiamine interacts with the vanilloid receptor, as do capsaicin and its analogues. When the researchers repeated a number of their experiments, but gave the rats a blocker for the vanilloid receptor, the effects were not observed.

Interesting stuff.

Source:
Planta Med. 2001 Oct;67(7):628-33.